Conference proceedings – Professionalization vs. Deprofessionalization

An important conference was held in Opatija, Croatia in March this year, entitled “Professionalization vs. Deprofessionalization: Building Standards for Legal Translators and Interpreters“, and  I have just been made aware that the presentations are now available from the European Legal Interpreters and Translators Association (EULITA) website.

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Criminocorpus

la sante

La Santé prison, Paris, France

Criminocorpus is an online scholarly publication on the subject of criminal justice history.

It provides researchers and the general public with free access to a wide range of primary sources, together with analysis of key subjects by leading specialists in the field. There are also a growing number of online multimedia exhibitions.

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Short course – Legal & business English for lawyers & related professions

worcester1The V edition of a summer program organized by the European Center for Continuing Legal Education (ECCLE) is to be held from 31 August to 5 September 2015 at Worcester College, Oxford University, in the United Kingdom.

This year’s course is entitled “Legal & Business Practice”, as is aimed at European lawyers, accountants, members of the judiciary, university lecturers and graduates in law & economics.

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Conference – Law, Language and Communication, Caserta, Italy

reggia casertaThe Centre for Research in Language and Law (CRILL) is holding its 4th international conference, entitled “Law, Language and Communication:
negotiating cultural, jurisdictional and disciplinary boundaries” from 26 to 28 May 2016, in Italy, at the Royal Palace of Caserta (National School of Public Administration).

The biennial conference attracts a wide spectrum of scholars and professionals from the fields of language and the law, as well as other related areas.

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Monday smile – Translating academic-speak into business-ese

Strictly speaking, today’s Monday smile is deadly serious. I just find rather whimsical the idea of it being necessary to “translate” in order to enable these two worlds to communicate.* However, as many of us know, business and academia do speak different languages.

jargonA research project being carried out in Paris has recently been reported in the press. Students from the linguistic engineering department at the University of Paris 13 have developed, using corpus techniques, a search engine to bring together the corporate world and universities.

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