Report – Translation & IP rights

keyboardbulbThe European Commission has recently published a report on Translation and intellectual property rights.

The law firm Bird & Bird LLP was commissioned for the study, which aims to provide an overview of some of the main intellectual property right issues relevant to the domain of translation, including in the field of machine-aided translations.

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Conference – ‘Crime in Translation’, Portsmouth, UK

media143091enSaturday 9th November, University of Portsmouth, UK

The translation of crime fiction is all around us, from the current wave of Scandinavian and European crime novels, film and television to recent screen adaptations of classic crime fiction such as Sherlock Holmes.

However it‚Äôs not only in fiction that translation meets crime. The police and the courts rely heavily on public service interpreters and translators. Translation itself is criminalised in various ways, e.g. in relation to copyright infringement, legal proceedings against translators of ‚Äėproblematic‚Äô texts and various forms of piracy.

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Legal considerations – machine translation and copyright

This guest post is published under a GNU version 2 licence, and comes from the Open Translation Tools Manual (more about that in a forthcoming post). It was written by Ed Bice in 2009, with modifications by Thom Hastings also in 2009. Despite being 3 years old, I think it brings up some very interesting topics for discussion. I look forward to reading your comments!

American copyright law considers a translation a derivative work. As such translators must obtain permission from the copyright or derivative right holder of the source language text. With regard to online translation, we expect that as Machine Translation (MT) and Hybrid Distributed Translation (HDT- strategies combining human and machine translation) come of age significant changes will need to be made to the legal framework to accommodate these technologies.

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