Book publication – État des lieux de la traductologie dans le monde

I’ve been waiting for the publication of this tome for ages. And here it finally is!

Résumé: L’ouvrage aborde les aspects essentiels de la traductologie dans de nombreux pays d’Europe, d’Asie, du Moyen-Orient et du Maghreb, d’Amérique du nord, d’Amérique du sud et d’Océanie, que ce soit sur le plan de l’histoire, de la théorie, de l’enseignement ou de la pratique de la traduction.

Nombre de pages: 850 Continue reading

Book publication – Interdisciplinary Comparative Law

Just before the summer saw the publication of ‘Interdisciplinary Comparative Law: Rubbing Shoulders with the Neighbours or Standing Alone in a Crowd‘ by Jaakko Husa.

In particular, Chapter 3 addresses the significance of language for comparative law by asking what is comparative law’s relation to other disciplines that study language? The chapter focuses on legal translation but also discusses, more generally, comparative legal linguistics and its relation to the comparative study of law.

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Book publication – Traité de juritraductologie

“Dans cet ouvrage, Sylvie Monjean-Decaudin met au jour une grille de lecture et pose les bases d’une véritable théorisation de la juritraductologie, qu’elle définit comme un nouveau champ d’étude interdisciplinaire à la confluence du droit, des langues et de la traduction, puisant ses racines dans les sciences juridiques et dans les sciences du langage. Bien que la traduction juridique ait des ramifications historiques lointaines, ce n’est que dans les années 1990 que la juritraductologie prend véritablement son essor.

Face au phénomène de mondialisation et à partir du constat de la vulnérabilité linguistique des personnes, l’auteure montre à quel point la question de la langue du droit est liée à l’accès à la justice. Au-delà des enjeux de traduction dans les instances supranationales et européennes, les États plurilingues et pluri-juridiques doivent également faire face à des défis spécifiques liés à la formulation plurilingue de leur législation.” Continue reading

Publication – ‘Machine translation : driven by humans, powered by technology’

The Directorate-General for Translation (European Parliament) has recently published a compilation of six contributions from its biennial internal conference, entitled “The Many Faces of Translation – Machine translation: driven by humans, powered by technology“.

“The theme of the 2021 conference was ‘Machine Translation: driven by humans, powered by technology’. Over the course of the two days, we explored how humans and machines can work together efficiently. One aspect was particularly important to us: the ethical aspects of artificial intelligence (AI). There is no doubt that AI has already become a key technology. The European Union needs to keep up with progress in this field. However, cutting-edge technology is not an end in itself. While AI should be part of our toolbox, humans must always be front and centre.”

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Book – Copyright Law and Translation: Access to Knowledge in Developing Economies

“Arguing that the translation of scientific and technical learning materials, and the publication of these translations in a timely and affordable manner, is crucially important in promoting access to scientific and technical knowledge in the developing world, this book examines the relationship between copyright law, translation and access to knowledge. Continue reading

Publication: Guidebook to Intellectual Property

“This is the new edition of a unique book about intellectual property. It is for those new to the subject, both law students and others such as business people needing some idea of the subject. It provides an outline of the basic legal principles, educating the reader as to the shape of the law. Critically, it also gives an insight into how the system actually works. You cannot understand chess by merely learning the rules – you also have to know how the game is played: so too with intellectual property.

The authors deliberately avoid technicalities: keeping things simple, yet direct. There are no footnotes to distract. Although cases are, inevitably, referred to, they are explained in a pithy, accessible manner.” Continue reading

Book publication – Machine translation for everyone: Empowering users in the age of artificial intelligence

Readers may be interested in the recent publication by Language Science Press, in open access pdf format, of an edited volume entitled “Machine translation for everyone: Empowering users in the age of artificial intelligence“.

Subjects covered are: Continue reading

Book publication – Language and Legal Interpretation in International Law

This month has seen the publication of ‘Language and Legal Interpretation in International Law’ edited by Anne Lise Kjaer and Joanna Lam. The book is part of the series ‘Oxford Studies in Language and Law’.

  • Examines patterns and strategies of legal interpretation across different fields of international dispute resolution
  • Takes an interdisciplinary approach through multiple research perspectives in language and law
  • Considers interpretation in the fields of trade law and commercial law, EU law, human rights law, and international criminal law.

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Book publication – Lawyers in 21st-Century Societies

The recently published “Lawyers in 21st-Century Societies” presents a collection of essays by eminent scholars from a wide variety of disciplines on the main issues currently confronting legal professions across the world.

It does this through a comparative analysis of the data provided by the reports on 46 countries in its companion volume: Lawyers in 21st-Century Societies: Vol. 1: National Reports (Hart 2020). Continue reading

Book publication: Multilingual Policy-Making in the European Union

The OAPEN network for open access books, funded by various European research councils and funds, has made available the title “The Language(s) of Politics: Multilingual Policy-Making in the European Union” by Nils Ringe and just published by University of Michigan Press.

Multilingualism is an ever-present feature in political contexts around the world, including multilingual states and international organizations. Increasingly, consequential political decisions are negotiated between politicians who do not share a common native language. Nils Ringe uses the European Union to investigate how politicians’ reliance on shared foreign languages and translation services affects politics and policy-making. Continue reading