Book publication – Phraseology in Legal and Institutional Settings

I’m happy to announce today the recent publication by Routledge of Phraseology in Legal and Institutional Settings – A Corpus-based Interdisciplinary Perspective, edited by Stanislaw Goźdź-Roszkowski and Gianluca Pontrandolfo.

The volume is intended to be a resource for linguists interested in phraseology as well as lawyers and legal scholars, translators, lexicographers, terminologists and students who wish to pursue research in the area.

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Monday smile – Beware of small print

Loving this “joke” clause inserted into the T&Cs of a wifi firm in the UK.

Having failed to read the small print of the terms and conditions of their contract, it seems that 22,000 people are “legally bound to 1000 hours of community service, including, but not limited to, cleaning toilets at festivals, scraping chewing gum off the streets and ‘manually relieving sewer blockages’”.

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All about interpreting and translating for Europe

The Interinstitutional Committee for Translation and Interpretation, the forum for cooperation between the language services of the European Union institutions and bodies, has recently published an updated 24-page guide entitled “Interpreting and translating for Europe“.

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Book publication – Handbook on notarial deeds (FR/ES)

Today it is a pleasure to inform you of the recent publication of a comparative study of notarial deeds issued in the French and Spanish legal systems “Manual de traducción jurada de documentos notariales en materia de sucesiones entre los sistemas jurídicos francés y español“.

It is intended for legal and certified translators, lecturers and researchers in the field of Legal Translation Studies, and for comparatists and notaries public wishing to consolidate their thematic competence on civil law and, specifically, on French and Spanish notarial and inheritance law. Continue reading

Monday smile – Perchers, slug-a-beds and sillytonians

Dominic Watt, senior lecturer at the University of York, UK, and his team of researchers have recently published a list of strange English words that had almost disappeared from use.

Watt was quoted as saying “We’ve identified lost words that are both interesting and thought-provoking, in the hope of helping people re-engage with language of old”.

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