Conference – The Price of Translation, Turku, Finland

The University of Turku, Finland is hosting the XVI Kätu Symposium on Translation and Interpreting Studies, on the theme of The Price of Translation, from 13-14 April 2018.

The conference will examine questions such as: How much are translators and interpreters paid today and who pays them? What did translation cost a thousand, a hundred or fifty years ago? Can a price be defined in other ways than money? How is the constant state of flux of the translation industry reflected in the well-being of translators? How does tendering affect the quality of translation and interpreting? In which circumstances do the negative aspects of translation outweigh the benefits? Can translation research have any negative effects?

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Videogallery – UN careers in translation, interpreting and more

Multilingual insights into translation, interpreting, and précis-writing careers at different United Nations offices can be found in this videogallery.

Job descriptions for these careers – and more, such as copy preparers, reference assistants and terminologists – can be found under the “Careers” tab, while the tab “eLibrary” contains “Useful links”.

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Legal English workshop, Bialystok, Poland

bialystokThe Białystok Legal English Centre, Faculty of Law, University of Białystok, Poland is organising its second workshop for teachers, translators and interpreters of Legal English: “Share & Gain“, to take place from 8-9 September 2016. The workshops bring together experienced and inexperienced teachers, translators and interpreters of Legal English to share their knowledge, ideas and experience.

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Webinar – Interpreting […], a quality business

webinarThe International Association of Professional Translators and Interpreters (IAPTI) is offering a webinar this Friday May 30, 2014 at 5 p.m. UTC, entitled “Interpreting: An essential profession and a business… a quality business. Underlining the benefits of a good service

The webinar will be presented by Tony Rosado, and you may remember him from his guest posts When we are asked to translate useless materials; The ten worst things a judge can do to a court interpreter; and Taniguchi case outcome – A good or a bad thing for justice? 

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Guest post – Select Committee evidence on legal interpreting

guest bookToday I would like to present a most valuable guest post from Dr Yvonne Fowler, who gave written evidence to the UK’s Justice Select Committee as part of its investigations into what can only be described as an outsourcing fiasco.

I believe that Dr Fowler’s paper covers the key issues in a clear, incisive and succinct way, and that the points raised can easily (and should) be transposed to apply to court interpreting globally.

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Free seminars on translation & interpreting, London, UK

logo_ls2013As part of the Language Show Live, to be held at Olympia, London, UK, from 18-20 October 2013, there are a number of free seminars that might be of interest to you.

There will of course be a number of exhibitors to visit too, including professional bodies, translation companies, publishers,  the European Commission, educational institutions…

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Court interpreting for migrant community needs in Maine, USA – a focused approach

guest bookThis guest post by Judy Harrison, courts reporter, is published with kind permission from the Bangor Daily News*. It discusses interpretation for migrants – in languages where professional, qualified interpreters are often not available. I had an interesting discussion about this issue with a person working in international civil rights and methods of training for those speaking rare languages. I’d love to hear your opinions!

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Guest post – Reporting from the Justice Interpreting seminar

guest bookToday Marta Stelmaszak is reporting from the seminar “Justice Interpreting: the Need for Quality Standards” held in London on 23 February last (see here). Marta is a Polish translator and interpreter from the UK and is “devoted to constant development”, including through her involvement on the Management Committee of the Chartered Institute of Linguists and her great blog. Over to you, Marta!

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