Guest post – Select Committee evidence on legal interpreting

guest bookToday I would like to present a most valuable guest post from Dr Yvonne Fowler, who gave written evidence to the UK’s Justice Select Committee as part of its investigations into what can only be described as an outsourcing fiasco.

I believe that Dr Fowler’s paper covers the key issues in a clear, incisive and succinct way, and that the points raised can easily (and should) be transposed to apply to court interpreting globally.

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Guest post – Reporting from the Justice Interpreting seminar

guest bookToday Marta Stelmaszak is reporting from the seminar “Justice Interpreting: the Need for Quality Standards” held in London on 23 February last (see here). Marta is a Polish translator and interpreter from the UK and is “devoted to constant development”, including through her involvement on the Management Committee of the Chartered Institute of Linguists and her great blog. Over to you, Marta!

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Monday smiles – Crackpot UK laws

Many thanks to Mary Lynn for sending me this idea…

The UK’s most ancient laws are often a rich source of mirth – here is a short list, including a nod to the upcoming festive season. My absolute favorite, though, is the one about the taxman. 🙂 However many times I read it, it just goes round and round in my head!

  • It is illegal to die in the Houses of Parliament.
  • It could be regarded an act of treason to place a postage stamp bearing the British king or queen’s image upside-down.
  • Eating mince pies on Christmas Day is banned.
  • The head of any dead whale found on the British coast automatically becomes the property of the King, and the tail of the Queen.
  • It is illegal not to tell the tax man anything you do not want him to know, but legal not to tell him information you do not mind him knowing.
  • It is illegal to enter the Houses of Parliament wearing a suit of armour.

You might also like this post about the simplification of the UK statute book.