Contract law translation series (DE-EN / EN-DE)

The German network of the UK association ITI has organised a three-part webinar series which examines the basics of German and English contract law, fundamental principles, practical challenges in translation, specific requirements when translating legal texts, pitfalls and approaches.

Although the first webinar is now past and was fully booked, the organisers have reopened applications, having decided that they can accommodate another 8 attendees, who will be able to watch the recording of the first session and take part in the remainder of the sessions. Continue reading

Book review – Contract Law, A Comparative Introduction

contractlawI’m sure that many¬†of you¬†will¬†be interested in a book published in 2014 by Edward Elgar Publishing entitled “Contract Law:¬†A Comparative Introduction“. The author is the estimable¬†Jan M. Smits, Professor of European Private Law, Faculty of Law, Maastricht University, The Netherlands.

“This book offers a unique introduction to contract law by means of a comparative approach. It treats contract law as a discipline that can be studied on the basis of common principles and methods without being tied to a particular jurisdiction or legal culture.”

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Conference – European contract law and property rights

Santiago.de.Compostela.Catedral.NocheThe¬†Society of European Contract Law (SECOLA) is organizing a conference –¬†European Contract Law and the Concept of Proprietary Rights – that¬†will take place on 7 and 8 June 2013 in Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

Some examples of issues to be broached include:

  • Proprietary remedies
  • Protection of IP
  • Transaction costs
  • Information disclosure
  • Securitization of contracts
  • Collateralization of contracts
  • Comparative law approaches.

You can download the full programme here, as well as information on registration and accommodation.

Monday smiles – Sea-ing double

This is actually a key case from English contract law – but at the same time almost unbelievable. Apologies to any readers who know all about the case already.

It is the story of two ships with identical names, doing an identical voyage, carrying identical cargoes. One the parties involved is even called Raffles (for those who don’t know him, there was a ‘gentleman thief’ character of the same name, created by a relative of Conan Doyle).

Suspend your disbelief for a moment, and read on…

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