Webinar – Ethics for court interpreters

ethicsThe National Center for Interpretation at the University of Arizona is offering a language-neutral webinar in two sessions on 18 & 25 October 2014.

This workshop is designed to familiarize you with the Code of Ethics that court interpreters use to guide them in ethically fraught situations. Through discussions and exercises with the trainer and other participants, you will acquire the tools to successfully navigate situations where ethical considerations are at stake.

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Guest post – Red T

guest bookI am honoured to welcome a guest post from Maya Hess, the founder of Red T, a non-profit organization dedicated to the protection of translators and interpreters (T&Is) in conflict zones and other adversarial settings. Comprising a team of volunteers, Red T advocates worldwide on behalf of linguists at risk, raises awareness of their plight and promotes their safety. Below is an interview that is reprinted with permission from GALA (Globalization and Localization Association).

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Happy Birthday WordstoDeeds!

Dear Readers,

Today marks one year from the launch of this blog, and I just wanted to take the opportunity to thank you all so much for reading, contributing and sharing here.

My aim, as you know, was to create a platform for bridges to be built between translators, interpreters, legal professionals and academia. I feel we have made a really good start, and look forward to continuing this virtual adventure with you all.

Warm wishes and thanks to all of you.

20 tips for lawyers working with interpreters

I’m sure lawyers taking depositions from deponents speaking other languages, especially when travel to foreign countries is required, are fully aware of the logistic costs involved, and wish to get the best results from interpreters working with them. This post was originally written for journalists working with interpreters, but I felt strongly that it applied so well to the legal context that it was worth sharing with you all.

Of course one or two of the items would generally not apply in a deposition context, such as giving the deponent the option to speak a language other than their own (tip n° 10), but the vast majority of the points mentioned would improve things dramatically in my experience!

Perhaps the key thing to take away is that by making the efforts below you are not ‘making the interpreter’s job easier’ but making your communication more effective, and, ultimately, getting a better result.

See what you think… 

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