All about interpreting and translating for Europe

The Interinstitutional Committee for Translation and Interpretation, the forum for cooperation between the language services of the European Union institutions and bodies, has recently published an updated 24-page guide entitled “Interpreting and translating for Europe“.

Continue reading

Guest post – Red T

guest bookI am honoured to welcome a guest post from Maya Hess, the founder of Red T, a non-profit organization dedicated to the protection of translators and interpreters (T&Is) in conflict zones and other adversarial settings. Comprising a team of volunteers, Red T advocates worldwide on behalf of linguists at risk, raises awareness of their plight and promotes their safety. Below is an interview that is reprinted with permission from GALA (Globalization and Localization Association).

* * *

Continue reading

Guest post – Online training by eCPD

guest bookAs you know, this blog is non-commercial, so the following post is very much in the spirit of information sharing, and not advertising. In my opinion, there are so few training resources available (especially that are not tied down geographically!) that we must share all we can. I have posted before about eCPD here and here, but this time Lucy Brooks, the founder, is going to tell us directly about eCPD’s latest venture… Over to you Lucy!

Continue reading

Happy Birthday WordstoDeeds!

Dear Readers,

Today marks one year from the launch of this blog, and I just wanted to take the opportunity to thank you all so much for reading, contributing and sharing here.

My aim, as you know, was to create a platform for bridges to be built between translators, interpreters, legal professionals and academia. I feel we have made a really good start, and look forward to continuing this virtual adventure with you all.

Warm wishes and thanks to all of you.

Zen and working methods

A very interesting article in the Law Society Gazette last week about flexible working patterns grabbed my attention. Here is a taster: “The term ‘work/life balance’ has such negative connotations in private practice that some firms have banned it from their vocabulary.” The article deals particularly with the problems female lawyers have, but not only – it also talks about flexibility enabling men to pursue parallel careers as well, “such as writing a book or singing in a choir”.

Translators, on the other hand, rather than having the problem of getting out of the office, sometimes have a problem with staying at home too much. A great post over at Patenttranslator’s Blog – “Translator’s Dementia (TD) – What it is and How to recognize the Signs” includes a lovely description of the typical “home office” :). Jill Sommer, on the other hand, gave some really good advice for those who work at home in her 2009 post “Establishing a work-life balance and overcoming loneliness“.

So, following in the estimable footsteps above, here’s my seven-point guide.

Continue reading

Canadian legal advice – webinar library

The Law Foundation of Ontario funds an excellent website which covers family law, consumer law, criminal law, education law, employment and work, environmental law, health and disability, housing law, human rights, immigration and refugee law, the legal system, social assistance and pensions, and wills and estates.

Although the content is specific to Ontario, Canada, it contents a wealth of legal information, links and an archive of legal education webinars that can be freely accessed.

In my opinion, it could be really useful both for translators and for lawyers whose native language is not English.

Here is a direct link to the webinar section of the site.
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/training-archive

Machine translation of the law

In this post, I would like to give you a taster of the controversial subject of machine translation (MT). Full references are given below so that you can read further if you are interested.

Potentially, MT could, inter alia, reduce costs, widen access to content, process large volumes of data in order to identify items of interest, make translators’ work more interesting by taking over repetitive tasks, and facilitate communication, for example in social networks or where very unfamiliar languages are involved. The key caveat is that users be clear about the limitations of MT with respect to the translation skopos (or purpose).

Continue reading