Language training handbooks for judicial cooperation

The European Judicial Training Network (EJTN) has produced, with the support of the European Union, a number of great handbooks on legal language, aimed at judicial cooperation across the Member States.

They are free to download, and contain introductions about vocabulary and syntax, summaries of points of law, and exercises for learners on each area, with a glossary and answer key.

I think they may be *very* useful for translators, lawyers working internationally, and many others, in addition to the judges for whom they were originally intended.

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Book publication – 4th Edition of A Manual of Style for Contract Drafting

Delighted to inform you that the 4th edition of A Manual of Style for Contract Drafting has recently been published. The author, Ken Adams, is a good and longstanding friend of this blog (e.g., guest posts here and here).

It is the only authoritative guide to the building blocks of contract language, and is in widespread use throughout the legal profession. The first edition was published by the American Bar Association in 2004.

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Book publication – Phraseology in Legal and Institutional Settings

I’m happy to announce today the recent publication by Routledge of Phraseology in Legal and Institutional Settings – A Corpus-based Interdisciplinary Perspective, edited by Stanislaw Goźdź-Roszkowski and Gianluca Pontrandolfo.

The volume is intended to be a resource for linguists interested in phraseology as well as lawyers and legal scholars, translators, lexicographers, terminologists and students who wish to pursue research in the area.

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Symposium – Why is legal language so complicated? (London, UK)

handwritingOn 29 June 2016, the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies in London (UK), in association with the University of Palermo, Sicily, Dipartimento di Studi Europei e dell’integrazione internazionale (DEMS), offers a symposium entitled “Why is legal language so complicated? Legislative drafters and linguists compare notes“.

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