Public consultation on language versions of federal laws in Canada

The Bijuralism Group of the Legislative Services Branch, Public Law and Legislative Services Sector, on behalf of the Department of Justice Canada, is seeking comments regarding the Fourth series of proposals to harmonize federal law with the civil law of the Province of Quebec and to amend certain Acts in order to ensure that each language version takes into account the common law and the civil law.

All interested members of the public are invited to review these documents and comment on the proposals.

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Guide to Canada’s system of justice

The Department of Justice Canada makes available a very clearly set out 42-page guide to Canada’s System of Justice.

Published in 2015, it provides general information about the origins of the Canadian legal system, updating laws, the Constitution, rights and freedoms, how the courts are organised, civil and criminal cases, the role of the public, and more.

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Post-conference event #W2D2017 – Bijuralism and Bilingualism à la canadienne!

canada_flag_map-svgInspired by a suggestion from one of the first participants to register, who explained that conference participants from outside the UK might like to extend their visit to London and maximise the use of their travel costs, we are now able to announce that #W2D2017 will be preceded and followed by two/three standalone legal translation events.

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Bijural terminology records

This is a great resource for translators working with French and English – the Canadian Department of Justice has published individual factsheets or “records” for terms that have been the subject of legislative harmonization between the common law and civil law systems. The records include many legal concepts (one of the trickiest things to translate 😉 ) so I think it’s really useful.

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High court judges should be bilingual…

Mr. Judge… according to the President of the Quebec Bar Association, on the occasion of the  formal swearing-in ceremony of the newest judge at Supreme Court of Canada. The head of the bar  declared “it is essential” that high court judges be drawn from the ranks of the best legal minds who “master” both official languages “given Canada’s linguistic diversity.”

The recently elected Mr Justice Richard Wagner is bilingual, as was Justice Marie Deschamps, who he replaces.

Another think struck me though, in addition to the arguments about linguistic diversity – how about the argument for bilinguallism and multilingualism as a way to open the mind? 🙂

WeBiText – another translation search engine

Today I’d like to tell you about a tool called WeBiText, under development at the National Research Council of Canada. It is quite similar to Linguee, a review of which I posted last week – it searches a corpus and provides parallel extracts of translations. WeBiText can produce results for 30 languages, including a few unusual ones such as Inuktitut, Haitian Creole and Welsh.

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Termium® becomes quadrilingual and has a special legal section

After first using Termium®, the Government of Canada’s terminology and linguistic databank, when it came on a CD-ROM (anybody else remember that?), I now consult the online version from time to time.

Termium® has become quadrilingual (English, French, Spanish and Portuguese), although as yet only 18,000 words are available in Portuguese.

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